REACHnet Acting as Coordinating Center for New Orleans Hospitals Participating in National COVID-19 Study

 

Three New Orleans hospitals will participate in a national study focused on the impact COVID-19 is having on healthcare workers. Ochsner Medical Center, Tulane Health System and University Medical Center will all encourage local healthcare workers to join the Healthcare Worker Exposure Response & Outcomes (HERO) Registry, which is gathering personal accounts of clinical and life experiences from healthcare workers across the country with the goal of understanding the perspectives and problems faced by those on the COVID-19 pandemic front lines.

The registry will unite America’s healthcare workers into a community to facilitate rapid-cycle research, including an upcoming large study of hydroxychloroquine’s effectiveness in preventing coronavirus infections in healthcare workers. The HERO research program leverages PCORnet®, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network, and is funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). REACHnet, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute and funded by PCORI, is acting as the coordinating center for the three New Orleans sites.

The HERO Registry is asking hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals to participate, including nurses, therapists, physicians, emergency responders, food service workers, environmental services workers, interpreters, and transporters – anyone who works in a setting where people receive health care.

“The response of our region’s and nation’s frontline workers – especially those in healthcare – to the COVID-19 pandemic has been nothing short of heroic,” said Dr. Brandon Mauldin, Tulane Health System’s chief medical officer. “We all want to do everything we can to continue to support these individuals and understand how this situation has and is affecting them.”

The goals of the registry are to engage healthcare workers in a research community, understand their experiences and interests through ongoing surveys, and track critical health outcomes associated with caring for patients with COVID-19, such as stress and burnout. The HERO Registry will help speed clinical studies that address unmet needs for healthcare workers, such as an upcoming study of hydroxychloroquine. HERO-HCQ is a randomized clinical trial of approximately 15,000 HERO Registry participants that will evaluate whether hydroxychloroquine (brand name Plaquenil®) is better than placebo in preventing COVID-19 infection. It will be conducted through clinical research sites in PCORnet, including Ochsner and University Medical Center.

“Ochsner recognizes that providing support to our healthcare workers on the frontlines is a vital need – both for our community and our industry as a whole. We are proud to team up with Tulane Health System and University Medical Center, as well as healthcare systems across the nation to connect healthcare workers with the national HERO registry. We are confident that the findings will pave the way for additional support for healthcare workers during the COVID-19 response and for years to come,” said Julie Castex, MSN, APRN, ACNS-BC (Clinical Nurse Specialist, Infectious Disease and Pulmonary Research at Ochsner Health and Principal Investigator for the HERO-HCQ Trial site at Ochsner).

There is no cost to enroll in the HERO Registry and registration takes only a few minutes. Healthcare workers can participate as much or as little as they like in surveys and other opportunities. The registry will follow a protocol developed by the DCRI and data guidelines to keep healthcare worker information secure.

“We’re excited to partner with hospitals and health systems in our area on this important project,” said Dr. Jyotsna Fuloria, Vice President of Clinical Research at University Medical Center, which is part of LCMC Health. “Our healthcare workers have been at the forefront of the New Orleans COVID-19 response.  Participating in the HERO Registry is one of the many ways we are involved in researching questions and  collecting data that will enable us to enhance our support of our people both in the near and distant future.”

To learn more about the HERO Registry, visit https://heroesresearch.org.

 

About LCMC Health
Established in 2009, LCMC Health is a Louisiana-based, not-for-profit hospital system serving the healthcare needs of the Gulf Coast region. LCMC Health currently manages Children’s Hospital New Orleans, New Orleans East Hospital, Touro, University Medical Center New Orleans, and West Jefferson Medical Center.

About Ochsner Health
Ochsner Health is a system that delivers health to the people of Louisiana, Mississippi and the Gulf South with a mission to Serve, Heal, Lead, Educate and Innovate. Ochsner Health is a not-for-profit committed to giving back to the communities it serves through preventative screenings, health and wellness resources and partnerships with innovative organizations that share our vision. Ochsner Health healed more than 876,000 people from across the globe in 2019, providing the latest medical breakthroughs and therapies, including digital medicine for chronic conditions and telehealth specialty services. Ochsner Health is a national leader, named the top hospital in Louisiana and a top children’s hospital by U.S. News & World Report. As Louisiana’s leading healthcare educator, Ochsner Health and its partners educate thousands of healthcare professionals annually. Ochsner Health is innovating healthcare by investing in new technologies and research to make world-class care more accessible, affordable, convenient and effective. Ochsner’s team of more than 26,000 employees and 4,500 providers are working to reinvent the future of health and wellness in the region. To learn more about Ochsner Health, please visit www.ochsner.org. To transform your health, please visit www.ochsner.org/healthyyou.  

About Tulane Health System:
Tulane Health System is an acclaimed teaching, research and medical system serving the greater New Orleans area. Tulane has more than 500 credentialed physicians who provide leading-edge care, ranging from primary to tertiary to quaternary. Facilities in the New Orleans area include Tulane Medical Center, Tulane Lakeside Hospital, Tulane’s Lakeview Regional Medical Center campus, Tulane Cancer Center Comprehensive Clinic, Tulane Transplant Institute, Tulane Multispecialty Center Metairie, Tulane Multispecialty Center Uptown, Tulane Multispecialty Center Downtown and the Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine. Tulane Health System is a partnership jointly owned by HCA and Tulane University. For more information about Tulane Medical Center, please visit www.TulaneHealthcare.com or call 1-800-588-5800.

About the Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI):
LPHI, founded in 1997, is a statewide 501(c)(3) nonprofit and public health institute that translates evidence into strategy to optimize health ecosystems. Our work focuses on uncovering complementary connections across sectors to combine the social, economic, and human capital needed to align action for health. We champion health for people, within systems, and throughout communities because we envision a world where everyone has the opportunity to be healthy. For more information, visit www.lphi.org.

HERO Registry Now Open for Health Care Workers

Our REACHnet program is working with four hospital systems, Baylor Scott & White Health, LCMC Health, Ochsner Health System, and Tulane Medical Center, to enroll healthcare workers in the Healthcare Worker Exposure Response & Outcomes (HERO) Registry. Even though we’re working specifically with these health systems, the registry is open to ALL healthcare workers.

The Registry invites U.S. healthcare workers to share their clinical and life experiences in order to understand the perspectives and problems faced by workers on the COVID-19 pandemic front lines. After creating a profile on the registry, participants can choose to participate in surveys and receive invitations to future clinical trials.

The HERO Registry is asking hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals to join. This includes nurses, therapists, physicians, emergency responders, food service workers, environmental services workers, interpreters, and transporters – anyone who works in a setting where people receive health care.

Those interested in enrolling can do so by visiting https://heroesresearch.org.

LPHI and LDH to Host Regional Tele-Town Hall Series – COVID-19: Preparing for the Next Phase

The Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI) and Louisiana Department of Health (LDH) are hosting a regional series of tele-town halls called “COVID-19: Preparing for the Next Phase.” Each event will be moderated by Shelina Davis, CEO of LPHI, and Earl Benjamin-Robinson, deputy director of LDH’s Office of Community Partnerships & Health Equity. Local panelists will include each region’s medical director, faith-based leaders, community advocates, and local elected officials.

The goal of these informational sessions is to educate the community about COVID-19 response measures, discuss the phased re-opening approach, share information about available resources, and address community concerns. The dialogue will also focus on equitable health outcomes for all Louisianans, especially the African-American community who has been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19.        

Tuesday, May 5
11 a.m. – Region 1 (Greater New Orleans Area)
Recording – https://bit.ly/35xIBpV

4 p.m. – Region 9 (Hammond/North Shore Area)
Recording – https://bit.ly/2YDgDri

Thursday, May 7
11 a.m. – Region 2 (Baton Rouge Area)
Recording – https://bit.ly/2YHuDQH

4 p.m. – Region 8 (Greater Monroe Area)
Recording – https://bit.ly/2L82UAD

Tuesday, May 12
11 a.m. – Region 3 (Houma/River Parishes Area)
Recording – https://bit.ly/35UrrTn

Wednesday, May 13
11 a.m. – Region 4 (Acadiana Area)
Recording – https://bit.ly/2Lncos6

4 p.m. – Region 6 (Greater Alexandria Area)
Recording – https://bit.ly/2zInZ24

Thursday, May 14
11 a.m. – Region 7 (Greater Shreveport Area)
Recording – https://bit.ly/2LGWlpj

4 p.m. – Region 5 (Lake Charles Area)
Recording – https://bit.ly/2LtEBgQ

LPHI Signs Letters of Support for Public Health and Social Justice Measures Amid COVID-19

As an urgent matter of public health and safety, the Louisiana Public Health Institute, along with other partners, has formally urged local and state judges, law enforcement leaders, and elected officials to release youth who are in custody and people who are in jail and being held pretrial who are low risk, and those who are elderly with health issues that increase their susceptibility to COVID-19. We have also requested that these same individuals who are in jails and prisons receive the proper protections from COVID-19 (i.e., readily available access to anti-bacterial soap, water, and hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol, etc.).

Although we have seen some movement in the right direction, it is not enough

We have signed on to the Families & Friends of Louisiana’s Incarcerated Children letter; submitted a join request with Vera Institute of Justice – New Orleans; and submitted a request with assistance from the Pew Charitable Trusts.

Moving quickly in this situation is of the utmost importance. We believe these additional public health measure will continue to slow the spread of COVID-19 amid this global pandemic and keep our local and state health care capacity at a manageable level.

If your organization would like to partner on a public health letter of support or other COVID-19 efforts, please reach out to us via covid19response@lphi.org.

LPHI to Co-Host Tele-Town Hall on African-American Whole Health

Earlier this week, the Louisiana Department of Health released data showing that African-Americans account for more than 70 percent of the COVID-19 related deaths in the state.
In response to this alarming information, LPHI is partnering with the Urban League of Louisiana to host a Tele-Town Hall on Tuesday, April 14 at 5 p.m. LPHI CEO Shelina Davis and Judy Reese Morse, CEO of the Urban League, will be joined by a panel of health and community leaders to discuss the impact of COVID-19 on African-American whole health, including physical, mental, and spiritual.
We hope you will join us and lend you voice to this important conversation. You can register for the webinar here.

COVID-19

COVID-19

The Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI) is committed to supporting Louisiana residents as we work together in the face of an unprecedented public health disaster. 

LPHI has conducted two statewide surveys on COVID-19 to ask participants about their knowledge of COVID-19, how their behaviors have changed during the pandemic, vaccine willingness, how the pandemic has impacted them, the status of their physical and mental health, and more. The first survey was conducted in June 2020 and the second was conducted in February 2021. Additional information about the surveys, the full report, and overview documents can be found on the COVID-19 Survey page

With funding from Baptist Community Ministries, LPHI conducted an assessment to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Greater New Orleans behavioral health system (mental health and substance use services). LPHI surveyed and spoke with 154 behavioral health service providers and clients from Orleans, Jefferson, St. Bernard, St. Tammany, and Plaquemines parishes from August 3 to August 19, 2020. The full assessment can be found here

Current information on COVID-19 in Louisiana, including information on the risks, spread, prevention measures, and case counts, can be found on the Louisiana Department of Health website. Information on vaccine providers, boosters, and vaccination events can be found here and a statewide list of testing sites can be found hereCompiled below is information from trusted resources that can be used by the public, providers, and public health professionals.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, including a fever, cough, or shortness of breath, call your primary care provider. Do not go to the doctor without calling first. If you do not have a primary care provider, call the Louisiana Department of Health hotline at 1-855-523-2652. If you are severely ill and you think you need hospitalization, call 911 or go to an emergency room.

General Information and Resources

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Additional Information from State Agencies

Information for Providers and Public Health Professionals

Grant Funding Opportunities in Louisiana

LPHI Receives Funding to Reduce HIV/AIDS Stigma

The Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI) was recently highlighted in a Gambit article as a recipient of $82,500 in grant funding from the Southern AIDS Coalition through the Gilead COMmitment to Partnership in Addressing HIV/AIDS in Southern States (COMPASS) Initiative. Three other organizations in Louisiana are also receiving funding during this grant cycle.

LPHI will utilize the funding to implement the Framework for Dialogue program in communities within New Orleans and Baton Rouge. The program will bring together people living with HIV/AIDS, faith leaders, and others to create community-driven action plans that address stigma around HIV/AIDS. These plans are designed to be sustainable at the community level even beyond the funding timeline.

Reduction in stigma increases HIV/AIDS testing and access to treatment, which then leads to suppressed viral loads for people living with HIV/AIDS and prevents transmission. All of these steps are critical to ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

We appreciate this opportunity from the Southern AIDS Coalition and Gilead Sciences and look forward to the positive impact we can make in the community during this grant cycle and beyond.

Oak Grove Passes Comprehensive Smoke-Free Ordinance

Oak Grove, La. – (December 11, 2019) – The Town of Oak Grove unanimously voted last night in favor of protecting the health of residents by implementing a smoke-free ordinance. The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) and members of the Coalition for a Tobacco Free Louisiana (CTFLA) applaud the Mayor and Town Council for their vote.

The smoke-free measure, which was voted on and passed Tuesday, December 10, will ensure all residents will be protected from the dangerous health effects of secondhand smoke. This ordinance includes e-cigarettes and vape products, in addition to combustible tobacco products. The ordinance goes into effect on December 11, 2019, making Oak Grove the 28th municipality in the state of Louisiana to become smoke-free. This brings the total population of Louisiana residents protected by smoke-free ordinances to 1,049,454.

“It is no secret that I was opposed to this measure in its original form, as I felt it went too far in its scope,” said Oak Grove Mayor Adam Holland. “However, after years of working on this with Jennifer and her partners, I believe we have developed a solid piece of legislation that promotes a healthy life style and encourages young people not to smoke — all while maintaining individual property and civil liberty rights for both smokers and non-smokers alike.”

“Residents of Oak Grove will now be able to breathe easier with the passing of this smoke-free ordinance,” said Jennifer Haneline, TFL Regional Manager. “We appreciate the continued support from Mayor Holland, the Town Council, and Partners in Prevention, and congratulate them on this great step forward in protecting the health of the community.”

For more information on the growing movement to protect all Louisiana employees from secondhand smoke, visit www.HealthierAirForAll.org.

Individuals interested in quitting tobacco products can visit www.QuitWithUsLa.org or call 1-800-Quit-Now.

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The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living
The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) engages in local and statewide tobacco control policy efforts that focus on tobacco prevention and initiation among youth, eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke, promote cessation services, and identify and eliminate tobacco-related disparities. TFL is guided by best practices in tobacco control and envisions a healthier Louisiana by reducing the excessive burden of tobacco use on all Louisianans. For more information visit www.tobaccofreeliving.org. To find out more about the dangers of secondhand smoke and show your support for a smoke-free Louisiana, visit www.healthierairforall.org. To learn more about quitting tobacco, visit www.quitwithusla.org.

About the Louisiana Cancer Research Center (LCRC)
Founded by the Louisiana State Legislature in 2002, the LCRC is a public-private partnership designed to promote education about cancer and conduct important research on the diagnosis, detection, treatment, and prevention of cancer in Louisiana. The LCRC partners with the public at large and four major cancer research institutions in Louisiana: LSU Health, Tulane University, Ochsner Health System, and Xavier University. More information about the LCRC is available at www.louisianacancercenter.org.

About the Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI)
LPHI, founded in 1997, is a statewide 501(c)(3) nonprofit and public health institute that translates evidence into strategy to optimize health ecosystems. Our work focuses on uncovering complementary connections across sectors to combine the social, economic, and human capital needed to align action for health. We champion health for people, within systems, and throughout communities because we envision a world where everyone has the opportunity to be healthy. For more information, visit www.lphi.org.

Louisiana Public Health Institute’s Family Health Team launched its newest program: Askable Adults Louisiana!

Askable Adults is a nationally recognized training program that prepares youth-serving adults to be more approachable and knowledgeable about adolescent sexual and reproductive health, and to be more proactive in referring youth for sexual and reproductive healthcare. Askable Adult trainings are recommended for adults who work in schools, community-based, faith-based, and recreational organizations to assure that they are ready when they are faced with questions from young people they support. The training allowed supportive individuals to feel more at ease answering difficult questions, more knowledgeable about laws regarding adolescent sexual health, and more prepared to link young people with necessary services and information.

Our first cohort of trainers for Askable Adults Louisiana participated in a two-day training of the trainers, which was presented by Access Matters in New Orleans from October 10 – 11.​

 

To learn more, contact Family Health Director Kristi Bardell at kbardell@lphi.org.

LPHI Releases Parent Survey Results on Sex Education

(New Orleans, LA) – November 20, 2019 – Today the Louisiana Public Health Institute released data from a statewide survey of parents on what they know, believe, and perceive about school-based sex education. Results from the survey confirm that, regardless of religious or political affiliation, Louisiana parents overwhelmingly support sex education in schools. Data shows that 83 percent of parents believe sex education is an important part of the school curriculum and 80 percent believe schools should be required to offer sex education.

“School-based sex education that is medically accurate and age appropriate, while also discussing abstinence, contraception and healthy relationships is a valuable tool to empower youth to live healthier lives,” said Kristie Bardell, managing director at the Louisiana Public Health Institute. “Our goal is to provide extra support for the primary role parents and caregivers have in educating their own children about sex and personal values.”

Almost two-thirds of parents surveyed said they tell their children to wait until they are married to have sex, but 94 percent of that group agrees that if their child decides to have sex before marriage they should be taught about how to prevent sexually transmitted infections and/or pregnancy.

“As people of faith it is our responsibility to help all people recognize their sacred lives as healthy and whole,” said Reverend Darcy Roake. “A large part of that responsibility is providing accurate information, particularly to young people, about their bodies and reproductive lives so they can make decisions that are informed, responsible and respectful of themselves and others. Giving a young person accurate information and helping them navigate choices and responsibilities in a complicated world lets them know that they too are sacred and worthy.”

Louisiana currently has some of the highest numbers in the nation for adolescent syphilis diagnoses, adolescent gonorrhea and chlamydia diagnoses, and adolescent HIV diagnoses. Despite these poor health outcomes among youth, state law does not require schools to teach sex education.

“Sex education reduces misinformation or lack of understanding about sexual health,” said Bardell. “A statewide curriculum with factual information helps teens make good decisions when facing issues related to sexual health, leading to better health outcomes.”

Some students receive sex education in school, but there is no way to track the quality of instruction. A state-wide sex education law would ensure all students receive quality sex education to help make informed decisions about their health. Three quarters of parents surveyed agree that a sex education program which emphasizes abstinence and also includes information on birth control, including condoms, should be taught in schools.

Sex education includes age-appropriate, medically accurate information on a broad set of topics related to sexuality, including human development, healthy relationships, decision making, abstinence, contraception, cyber safety, sexual assault, and disease prevention. Sex education provides young people with facts on topics they will likely encounter and reinforces the conversation families may already be having at home. Sex education lowers the risk of unintended pregnancy, delays sexual activity, and reduces the number of sexual partners. It does not increase young people’s sexual activity.

Geaux Talk, an awareness initiative to engage Louisiana caregivers, students, educators, and legislators in honest, fact-based conversations about sex education, provides tools to start conversations about sexual health both at home and with school administrators. The full state-wide report and regional fact sheets can be accessed on the Geaux Talk site here.

 

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About the Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI)
LPHI, founded in 1997, is a statewide 501(c)(3) nonprofit and public health institute that translates evidence into strategy to optimize health ecosystems. Our work focuses on uncovering complementary connections across sectors to combine the social, economic, and human resource needed to align action for health. We champion health for people, within systems, and throughout communities because we envision a world where everyone has the opportunity to be healthy. For more information, visit www.lphi.org.

Children and Youth Planning Board’s Childhood Trauma Task Force Releases Final Report

Download the newly produced report by Children and Youth Planning Board’s Childhood Trauma Task Force, Called to Care: Promoting Compassionate Healing for Our Children. This report was prepared per a Resolution of the New Orleans City Council (No. R-18-344), and adopted on August 9, 2018. That resolution called for the creation of a one-year task force to develop a comprehensive plan to reduce the occurrence and impact of trauma on children and families within the City of New Orleans. This plan is to include strategies for the prevention of trauma, proper assessment of childhood trauma, and effective intervention to help children and families heal.

The Louisiana Public Health Institute’s director of Family Health, Kristie Bardell, and several of our partners served as task force members.

Reeves Passes Comprehensive Smoke-Free Ordinance

Reeves Passes Comprehensive Smoke-Free Ordinance
Ordinance Will Go Into Effect December 11, 2019

Reeves, La. – (November 12, 2019) – The Village of Reeves unanimously voted last night in favor of protecting the health of residents by implementing a smoke-free ordinance. The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) and members of the Coalition for a Tobacco Free Louisiana (CTFLA) applaud the Mayor and Board of Aldermen for their vote. This is the first comprehensive smoke-free ordinance to be implemented in Allen Parish.

“The Village of Reeves is pleased to take this step and become a smoke-free community,” said Reeves Mayor Chris Guillory. “We’re building a healthier Reeves for all of our residents as our community grows and progresses.”

The smoke-free measure, which was voted on and passed Monday, November 11, will ensure all residents will be protected from the dangerous health effects of secondhand smoke. When the ordinance goes into effect on December 11, 2019, Reeves will become the 27th municipality in the state of Louisiana to become smoke-free. This brings the total population of Louisiana residents protected by smoke-free ordinances to 1,047,800.

“Residents of Reeves will now be able to breathe easier and healthier in public spaces with the passing of this smoke-free ordinance,” said Janice Ackley, TFL Regional Manager. “We appreciate the continued support from Mayor Chris Guillory and Board of Alderman and congratulate them on this great step forward in protecting the health of the community.”

For more information on the growing movement to protect all Louisiana employees from secondhand smoke, visit www.HealthierAirForAll.org.

Individuals interested in quitting tobacco products can visit www.QuitWithUsLa.org or call 1-800-Quit-Now.

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The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living
The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) engages in local and statewide tobacco control policy efforts that focus on tobacco prevention and initiation among youth, eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke, promote cessation services, and identify and eliminate tobacco-related disparities. TFL is guided by best practices in tobacco control and envisions a healthier Louisiana by reducing the excessive burden of tobacco use on all Louisianans. For more information visit www.tobaccofreeliving.org. To find out more about the dangers of secondhand smoke and show your support for a smoke-free Louisiana, visit www.healthierairforall.org. To learn more about quitting tobacco, visit www.quitwithusla.org.

About the Louisiana Cancer Research Center (LCRC)
Founded by the Louisiana State Legislature in 2002, the LCRC is a public-private partnership designed to promote education about cancer and conduct important research on the diagnosis, detection, treatment, and prevention of cancer in Louisiana. The LCRC partners with the public at large and four major cancer research institutions in Louisiana: LSU Health, Tulane University, Ochsner Health System, and Xavier University. More information about the LCRC is available at www.louisianacancercenter.org.

About the Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI)
LPHI, founded in 1997, is a statewide 501(c)(3) nonprofit and public health institute that translates evidence into strategy to optimize health ecosystems. Our work focuses on uncovering complementary connections across sectors to combine the social, economic, and human capital needed to align action for health. We champion health for people, within systems, and throughout communities because we envision a world where everyone has the opportunity to be healthy. For more information, visit www.lphi.org.

LPHI Collaborates with New Orleans District Attorney on Two Anti-Opioid Initiatives

District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro  announced two new initiatives to enhance New Orleans’ fight to reduce opioid-related deaths.

First, the New Orleans City Council voted unanimously on Thursday to approve adoption of ODMAP (Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program), an initiative proposed by the Orleans Parish District Attorney’s office on April 30.  The software program collects and provides real-time overdose surveillance data to first responders across jurisdictions to support public health and public safety responses to high overdose activity.

“So much of New Orleans’ street violence is linked to the trafficking of illegal narcotics, and yet overdose deaths recently surpassed the number of murders in our city,” Cannizzaro said. “Given the urgency of the situation, I am pleased that the City Council today acted upon our recommendation. The ODMAP program has succeeded in other jurisdictions, enabling health officials, social workers and law enforcement authorities to respond quickly to the precise areas where overdoses and fatal overdoses have spiked.”

The software was developed and donated by the federal Washington/Baltimore HIDTA program (High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas). The mapping tool enables first responders to track the frequency and severity of overdose calls, enabling a strategic analysis and response by health care providers, social workers and law enforcement. The data generated can serve as an early warning system about a particularly dangerous new drug supply, triggering enhanced treatment and prevention efforts. It can also support active police investigations targeting the most dangerous drug dealers impacting the city.

Assistant District Attorney Andre Gaudin Jr., the HIDTA unit prosecutor of Cannizzaro’s office, worked for more than a year to educate and convince city officials of the value    and importance of mandating ODMAP usage in New Orleans. The measure passed Thursday was supported by Dr. Jennifer Avegno of the New Orleans Department of Health, Dr. Emily Nichols of New Orleans EMS, Criminal Justice Commissioner Tenisha Stevens, Tyrell Morris of the Orleans Parish Communications District, and Councilman Jason Williams, who co-sponsored the ordinance with Council president Helena Moreno and Councilmember Kristin Gisleson Palmer.

Cannizzaro also announced that the OPDA’s office has been awarded a two-year grant providing nearly $357,000 to bring enhanced resources speedily to bear in the death investigations at fatal overdose crime scenes.

The proposed New Orleans Rapid Response Overdose Homicide unit combines a 24/7 on-call coroner’s office investigator with a dedicated Orleans Parish assistant district attorney and a multi-jurisdictional case advocate to help assess, investigate and more efficiently prosecute narcotics dealers or providers responsible for overdose deaths.

Assistant District Attorney Alexandra Serpas has been tasked to review evidence gleaned from fatal overdose crime scenes and collaborate with the case advocate and federal partners at the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Orleans Parish Coroner Dr. Dwight McKenna currently is seeking an experienced candidate to fill his new full-time investigator position funded through the grant.

“Both ODMAP and the overdose investigations grant reflect the continuing effort by our New Orleans-area joint task forces to target the worst, most violent drug dealers selling the most dangerous narcotics to our most vulnerable citizens,” Gaudin said. “Together, we continue striving to reduce the number of fatal overdoses in our city by offering treatment to those in need and aggressively prosecuting those seeking to make a profit off the disease of addiction.”

Both initiatives were realized by the Orleans Parish District Attorney’s office working in close collaboration with Kristin Lyman of the Louisiana Public Health Institute and the FBI’s New Orleans Gang Task Force directed by Special Agent Robert Baird.

2019 Louisiana Youth Tobacco Survey Shows Alarming Rise In Youth E-Cigarette Use

New Orleans, LA (October 31, 2019) – Today, the Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) released a shared report on e-cigarette use among Louisiana’s youth. Data from the 2019 Louisiana Youth Tobacco Survey (LYTS) shows an alarming rise in e-cigarette use among middle and high school students.

In 2019, approximately 32 percent of high school students and 15 percent of middle school students used vape products more than once. These numbers have doubled since 2017 and tripled since 2015. The Louisiana data follows the national trend of increased vape use among youth and young adults. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has labeled youth vape use an epidemic and is currently investigating more than 1,600 cases of lung injury and 34 deaths connected to vape use.

“We strongly encourage Louisiana’s educational leadership and policy makers to heed these alarming youth vape statistics,” said Tonia Moore, director of TFL. “Without regulations for vape products at the state level and addiction counseling at the school and community level for our young people, they will continue to receive misinformation from Big Tobacco and vapor industry influencers that puts their health in immediate jeopardy.”

Additionally, the survey asked students to identify the brand they utilized. Fifty-five percent of high school students who have ever used a vape product reported using a JUUL product. The next leading brand accounted for 16 percent of high school students’ use. JUUL is by far the most well-known brand among youth, and “JUULing” is often synonymous with “vaping.”

“One of TFL’s main goals is to prevent the initiation of all tobacco use among young people,” said Moore. “We will continue to work with school districts around the state to train students, parents, and educators about the dangers of these products and long-term effects they have on the body and brain development.”

As interest around vaping has intensified, TFL has seen an increase in the number of requests for these trainings. The presentations are particularly beneficial because they address common misconceptions about vaping, vaping terminology, and the nicotine content in vape products, among others. To request a training for your school or organization, please email tobaccofreeliving@lphi.org. Educational materials and fact sheets are also available for use here in the “Youth and Young Adult Section.”

TFL is also in the process of launching an awareness campaign called “Don’t Get FUULed” which targets youth and young adults. The digital campaign conveys similarities between vaping and traditional cigarette use and the tobacco industry’s involvement in vaping companies. The campaign can be viewed by visiting https://fuul.us/.

The complete data report for the Louisiana Youth Tobacco Survey will be available in 2020. Data from previous years can be found here. Additional resources, including tips for parents, educators, and coaches on how to talk to teens about vaping, can be found here.

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The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living
The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) engages in local and statewide tobacco control policy efforts that focus on tobacco prevention and initiation among youth, eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke, promote cessation services, and identify and eliminate tobacco-related disparities. TFL is guided by best practices in tobacco control and envisions a healthier Louisiana by reducing the excessive burden of tobacco use on all Louisianans. For more information visit www.tobaccofreeliving.org. To find out more about the dangers of secondhand smoke and show your support for a smoke-free Louisiana, visit www.healthierairforall.org. To learn more about quitting tobacco, visit www.quitwithusla.org.

About the Louisiana Cancer Research Center (LCRC)
Founded by the Louisiana State Legislature in 2002, the LCRC is a public-private partnership designed to promote education about cancer and conduct important research on the diagnosis, detection, treatment, and prevention of cancer in Louisiana. The LCRC partners with the public at large and four major cancer research institutions in Louisiana: LSU Health, Tulane University, Ochsner Health System, and Xavier University. More information about the LCRC is available at www.louisianacancercenter.org.

About the Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI)
LPHI, founded in 1997, is a statewide 501(c)(3) nonprofit and public health institute that translates evidence into strategy to optimize health ecosystems. Our work focuses on uncovering complementary connections across sectors to combine the social, economic, and human capital needed to align action for health. We champion health for people, within systems, and throughout communities because we envision a world where everyone has the opportunity to be healthy. For more information, visit www.lphi.org.

LPHI Uses 500 Cities Health Data to Advocate for Transportation Accessibility

Accumulating evidence shows that where people live, work, learn, and play has an impact on their health. Because of this, public health experts continually work to identify social determinants and craft solutions to factors that adversely affect health outcomes in our neighborhoods and communities at large.

Funded through a partnership between the Urban Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the 500 Cities Data Challenge project provided data capacity to nonprofit leaders and government officials, allowing us to illustrate the benefits of utilizing community health data to address social factors, such as informing policy investments in transportation and economic opportunity. By using census tract data, decision makers have the ability to explore issues and trends often masked at the parish level and determine specific areas where services and resources are most needed.

As a grantee, we collaborated with Bike Easy, the American Heart Association, and others to advocate for Complete Streets and contribute to the evidence base for municipal planning policies that promote mobility and increased transportation access for New Orleans, Kenner, and the larger region.

We used the 500 Cities data, along with complimentary data sources, to construct a preliminary overview of health and economic metrics, relating specifically to transportation, mobility access, and economic development in Jefferson Parish, including the cities of Kenner and Terrytown. The analysis has since been used to engage city officials and coalitions on data-driven approaches that integrate a health equity perspective into transportation policy.

In the analysis of 500 Cities health outcomes, we found that the census tracts with higher prevalence of poor health outcomes also tended to be the tracts with lower household incomes, less access to vehicles, and higher housing burdens (i.e., spending 30 percent of monthly income or more on housing). Therefore, we advocate that better connecting these neighborhoods (e.g., via sidewalks, transit stops, and protected bike lanes) to areas in the region that are better resourced or closer to job centers could offer residents more than just health benefits. The full project overview can be found here.

LPHI Applauds CDC Action Following Multistate Outbreak Associated with E-Cigarette Use

On Friday, August 30, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a health advisory following the multistate outbreak of severe pulmonary disease associated with e-cigarette use. The Louisiana Department of Health also issued an alert asking physicians and other health care providers to report these suspect cases to state health officials. We at the Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) fully support these effort to alert the public and health care providers about this dangerous outbreak.

As of August 27, there have been 215 possible cases and one death reported from 25 states, including nine cases in Louisiana. The CDC continues to investigate additional reports of pulmonary illness across the country. All of those who have been affected have reported using e-cigarette products. According to the CDC, available evidence does not currently suggest that an infectious disease is the cause of the illnesses.

We at TFL have continued to voice concern about the dangers of e-cigarettes, despite the fact that they have been promoted as smoking cessation aids. E-cigarettes are NOT regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a cessation aid and some studies suggest that using e-cigarettes could lead to permanent changes in lung function. In addition to containing nicotine, the cartridges used for e-cigarettes and the vapor exhaled can contain carcinogens and toxins, including formaldehyde.

We recommend the general public to stop e-cigarette use and to seek medical care if they experience any symptoms. Those interested in quitting e-cigarettes or other tobacco products can receive support and resources by calling 1-800-Quit-Now or enrolling online.

Research Ready Training Resources

Research Ready Training Resources

Through the Research Ready project, LPHI developed the following resources to facilitate improved staff engagement in clinic-based research studies: a training for clinical staff to increase their knowledge of basic research principles and a guide for research teams to share best practices for implementing studies in clinical settings and communicating with clinical support staff. Content and format for the resources were informed by both clinic staff and research team members who conduct studies in clinical settings. Creation of the Research Ready resources was funded by a Eugene Washington Engagement Award from the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute. For additional information, please contact Daniele Farrisi.

Workbook: This training covers basic research principles as well as tips and strategies for staff members who will be supporting research studies at their workplaces. The workbook is designed to be used for self-guided study or as a compliment to facilitator-lead instruction.

E-learning: The content from the workbook is also available as an e-learning module which is also intended to be used for self-study.

Researcher guide: The researcher guide shares best practices for engaging clinic staff throughout the research process as a means to achieve successful implementation of studies in clinical care settings. The guide is presented in an issue brief format and includes a list of key recommendations as well a sample agendas for recommended meetings with clinical staff.

Implementation guide: The implementation guide provides step-by-step guidance for how to implement the various formats of the Research Ready training as well as helpful tips and recommendations for follow-up.

White paper: This document describes the training and summarizes the results of LPHI’s evaluation of the training and its implementation. It also includes tips and links to resources for providing the training to clinic staff.

About LPHI

Our Values

Accountability

We take responsibility for and ownership of our work and our impact on one another, our partners, and our communities

Community-Centered

We model the phrase “Nothing about us without us” in our work, which is anchored in communities.

Creativity

We approach our work with imagination, ingenuity, and calculated risk-taking as a commitment to progressive transformation

Equity

We are deeply committed to centering diversity, inclusion, justice, and fairness in all that we do.

Excellence

We are dedicated to exceeding expectations and are committed to continual improvement through listening, learning, and leadership.

Partnership & Trust

We build strong, long-lasting, and committed relationships through collaboration and teamwork, the cornerstones of our efforts to advance health and wellness.


The full Strategic Plan is available here

Stay up to date

Stay up to date on the latest about LPHI and sign up for our quarterly e-letter here


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: The Louisiana Public Health Institute, 1515 Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA, 70112, http://www.lphi.org. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

Board of Directors

Linda Usdin, DrPH, Board Chair

Founder/Director, Swamp Lily LLC,
Adjunct Faculty, Tulane School Of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Andrew Anderson, PHD

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Health Policy and Management, 
Tulane University 

Jennifer Avegno, MD

Director,
New Orleans Health Department

Lanor Curole

Tribal Administrator,
United Houma Nations

Joseph Kanter, MD

State Health Officer and
Medical Director,
Louisiana Department of Health

Somesh Nigam, PHD

SVP, Chief Analytics and Data Officer
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana

William Snowden

Director,
The Vera Institute New Orleans

Matthew Valliere, MPA

Chief Executive Officer,
CareSouth

Anu Varadharajan

Director,
KPMG, LLP

 

The RWJF Turning Point

The RWJF Turning Point: Collaborating for a New Century in Public Health program grant for Louisiana was awarded to LPHI. This program produced a state public health improvement plan that served as a blueprint for LPHI moving forward. The program was designed to transform and strengthen the public health infrastructure so that states, local communities, and their public health agencies may respond to the challenge to protect and improve the public’s health in the 21st Century. The Louisiana partnership created a forum for dialog among multiple health agencies, community and business organizations and the population of Louisiana that takes a systems approach to creating and sustaining change. To achieve this goal, the Louisiana partnership developed a governance structure built on collaborative relationships with the capacity and the tools necessary to build local partnerships and improve health information systems.

LPHI is a Part of the Build Health Challenge

ABOUT

High quality, affordable transportation is a vital linkage to opportunities, including the opportunity to be healthy. BUILD Health Mobility aspires to equitably improve health and well-being by addressing transportation and mobility barriers in New Orleans’ Claiborne Corridor. This collaborative aspires to influence policy and organizational practices, inform future transportation investments, and develop strategies to prioritize equity in health and transportation planning. transportation.

BUILD PRINCIPLES

BUILD and its communities apply bold, upstream, integrated, local, and data-driven (BUILD) approaches to improve health in communities that are adversely affected by upstream factors.

Bold

This project aspires to achieve concrete policy and systems changes. Some transportation and mobility plans for our region have not explicitly included health as a consideration and often do not use health as a metric of success for implementation. This collaboration offers another unique opportunity to influence the New Orleans policy landscape and built environment. Furthermore, as the successor to the legacy of Charity hospital, University Medical Center (UMC) looks to BUILD as an opportunity for UMC to go beyond its current role as health care provider and enhance its role as a contributing partner in community health improvement.

Upstream

In the Claiborne Corridor, public transit, walking, and biking are vital linkages to employment, education, grocery stores, health care, parks and recreation, and other community resources that influence health. The partnership brings previously unaligned partners together to work on policy and systems changes to create long-term impact on mobility and health for all live, work, learn, and play in the Claiborne Corridor.

Integrated

The partnership is unified under a shared vision of health and equity, where all residents have equal access to opportunities, including the opportunity to be healthy. Guided by a cross-sector partnership and engagement of diverse community leaders, this project brings complementary perspectives and assets into community and policy planning to advance mobility and equity for Claiborne residents.

Local

The Claiborne Corridor was intentionally identified as the geographic focus for this initiative based on the identification of place-based inequities. The presence of the I-10 overpass in the Claiborne Corridor creates a barrier to both health and mobility. Built in 1969 over a thriving black business district, construction of the overpass physically and culturally disrupted a vital corridor of major significance to the black community. Additionally, by focusing on mobility as an upstream lever for improving health, this project strives to create more equitable outcomes by deepening our understanding and then addressing unfair policies, systems and structures that limit the opportunity for residents to be healthy.

Data-Driven

Data is both a driver and an intended outcome of this project. Using community and hospital data sources, the project will reexamine neighborhood-level conditions and priorities in the Corridor in order to explore community-driven, targeted improvements in mobility and connectivity. Based on priority policy and systems change opportunities, the partnership will leverage unique hospital data to explore targeted questions and considerations around health and transportation. Additionally, the data infrastructure assets to be leveraged and aligned for this project can be applied to other change agendas outside of mobility, which will be an important consideration for the partnership as we establish a collaborative approach towards sustainability.

LPHI Partners in Louisiana Mental Health Coalition Convenings

The Louisiana Mental Health Coalition (LMHC) is a collective of organizations and individuals across Louisiana who support the following principles: 1) People with mental health needs should have access to high quality mental health services and treatment; 2) People with mental health needs should have access to sufficient community-based services and treatment such that they can live an integrated and independent life; 3) People with mental health needs have a right to participate in treatment decisions and their care.

Do you want to help improve mental health services across the state? Attend one of the LMHC’s upcoming convenings!

Associate Director at LPHI Speaks at 2019 PCPI Conference

This year’s conference is focused on population and patient-centered care and utilizing data for maximum impact. It will feature a range of talks, discussions, and networking opportunities on furthering the reaches of quality with experts and thought leaders in measurement, registries, and quality improvement.

Conference Agenda
We are pleased to present the outline agenda for our 2019 Conference, The Quality Landscape: Charting the Course for Success!  Our meeting will begin with our Advisory Committee meetings on November 10, continuing with our conference day on November 11, and concluding with our post-conference sessions on November 12.

Click here to view the 2019 PCPI Conference Outline Agenda (PDF)

This year’s Conference is focused on population and patient-centered care and utilizing data for maximum impact. We will feature several opportunities to engage with experts and thought leaders, and starting this year we are excited to include a Monday Night Social activity for Conference attendees to get the opportunity to mix and mingle with their peers!

Full Conference Program and more details coming soon!

Speakers
This year, we are thrilled to present an exciting roster of speakers including:

  • Renaisa Anthony, MD, MPH, the Deputy Director of the Center for Reducing Health Disparities at the University of Nebraska Medical Center
  • James Tcheng, MD, Professor of Medicine at Duke University Medical Center
  • Richard Gliklich, MD, CEO, OM1, Inc.
  • Michelle Leavy, MPH, Head, Healthcare Research & Policy, OM1, Inc.
  • Elise Berliner, PhD, Technology Assessment Program, Center for Evidence and Practice Improvement (CEPI) at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
  • Rebekah Angove, PhD, the Associate Director of Health Services Research at the Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI) and adjunct Assistant Professor at Tulane University

More speaker information to be announced! 


Hotel and Travel Information
By popular demand, this year’s conference will once again be held at the Fairmont Millennium Park in beautiful downtown Chicago.

 

Hotel reservations can be made by: Passkey Link
OR by calling our Global Reservations Center at 1-800-441-1414

Callers can identify themselves as being with PCPI Fall Meeting 2019 for ease of booking.

 

DIscounts

Have three or more registrants attending from your organization?  We offer a volume discount for concurrent registrations – use discount code ORG32019 for a 15% discount on the full conference (November 11 & 12) and ORG31DAY for a 15% discount on the conference day (November 11) only.

 

Call for Presentation Abstracts
The window for conference presentation submissions has now closed. Approvals for conference sessions will be sent out during the month of June.
Webinar series abstract submissions will continue to be accepted on a rolling basis. For more details and to submit your project, visit our abstract submission page. Webinar abstracts will be approved or denied within a month of submission.

 

 

Testimonials from our Fall 2018 Conference:

  • This is a great place to learn, meet like-minded individuals and share critical information vital to the improvement of quality within healthcare. Thank you for a great conference!
  • If you are active in the measure development/QCDR space, there is always something for you here.”

Got a question or suggestion for the PCPI 2019 Conference? Email us at info@thepcpi.org.

More on PCPI Conferences:

Conferences provide an opportunity to meet PCPI leadership and staff, network with fellow PCPI members, learn about the organization’s current work and future strategies in measurement science, registries and quality improvement and join PCPI’s efforts to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare.

Conferences are typically accompanied by pre-meeting workshops or one-day intensive conferences on issues related to our core program areas.

For information from past PCPI conferences, visit our Past Conferences page or contact info@thepcpi.org.

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LPHI Supports: Datavant Acquires Health Data Link to Expand Academic Ecosystem

Datavant, the leader in helping healthcare organizations safely link their data to improve medical research and patient care, today announced that it has acquired Health Data Link, the leading data linkage provider for academic medical centers, nonprofits, and government agencies. The acquisition strengthens Datavant’s offering to health systems, research institutes, and government agencies, and offers clients the ability to connect a variety of data types in Datavant’s open ecosystem in support of innovative medical research.

Over 40 institutions utilize Health Data Link’s health data connectivity solution, which will become seamlessly integrated with Datavant’s ecosystem of over 200 institutions that have made their health data linkable.

“We’re excited to take the excellent work that the Health Data Link team has done in the academic, nonprofit, and government communities, and to link that to our open data ecosystem where all health data can be connected,” said Travis May, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Datavant. “Our mission is to connect the world’s health data to improve patient outcomes, and we’re excited to further our traction in the research community.”

“From the start, our goal has been to build trusted data sharing networks to support medical research and drive improved patient outcomes,” said Abel Kho, Co-founder of Health Data Link. “When we met Travis and the broader Datavant team, we knew that we had found the right partner to carry our vision forward. We look forward to working together to connect health data sources and users across the entire healthcare system.”

“Bringing health data together without compromising patient privacy is the defining health policy issue of our time. Together, we can make integrated health data a reality, which means better research, better care, and improved outcomes. We are excited about the incredible strength of the Datavant team and the path ahead,” said Jacob Plummer, CEO of Health Data Link.

Jacob Plummer will join Datavant as General Manager, Health Systems and Government. Jasmin Phua, Co-founder and Chief Data Officer of Health Data Link, will serve as Head of Health Systems and Government Solutions. Abel Kho, MD, MS, FACMI, and Co-founder of Health Data Link will serve as a strategic advisor to the company.

Customer Quotes & Use Cases:

In Chicago, investigators at the Chicago Area Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Network (CAPRiCORN) have used the Health Data Link solution to connect data on over 10 million patients for the development of novel community-based direct patient recruitment techniques to determine trial eligibility for clinical trials, to identify trends in health service utilization for patients with care fragmented across institutions, and to provide accurate patient cohort estimates for academic, government, and industry sponsored research.

In New Orleans, Health Data Link is used by leading research network REACHnet, to link data across health care institutions and payers. REACHnet provides a centralized, integrated, medical research informatics infrastructure that brings together health systems, nonprofits, universities, payers, government, and private healthcare companies. “Health Data Link has played an instrumental role in enabling us to establish a platform with standardized, harmonized, high-quality longitudinal patient data. It has significantly accelerated our ability to link data from various partners including health systems, payers, public health disease registries, state death registries, and Medicaid,” said Thomas Carton, Principal Investigator, REACHnet and Chief Data Officer, Louisiana Public Health Institute.

As a representative linking engagement powered by Health Data Link, PRACnet, a patient centered health plan research network consisting of Humana and Medical Outcomes Management, collaborated with REACHnet to link health systems data in Greater New Orleans in support of an antibiotic study. The work was sponsored by the Patient Centered Research Outcomes Institute (PCORI), and the ability to link de-identified patient data across the two networks was key to achieving the goals of the study. Vinit Nair, Principal Investigator for PRACnet, said, “This study utilized Health Data Link’s technology to identify overlapping member populations, combining and reconciling prescription, medical, and dispensing information by linking claims and clinical records. This analysis enabled a more accurate understanding of the effects of antibiotic utilization while helping organizations protect patient privacy.”

Prior to the acquisition, Datavant had established its own relationships with a number of academic medical centers. “We have been working with Datavant since last fall to help us de-identify and safely share data among academic institutions participating in the Sight Outcomes Research Collaborative (SOURCE), a repository capturing detailed clinical data on patients receiving eye care services at academic medical centers throughout the United States,” said Joshua Stein, MD, MS, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan. “The ability to link de-identified patient data on those with ocular diseases across medical centers enables researchers to identify risk factors for ocular diseases, study surgical outcomes, assess for disparities in care, perform quality improvement initiatives, and leverage such data for deep learning and artificial intelligence research projects. We’re excited to hear about Datavant’s acquisition of HDL and look forward to working with the expanded team going forward.”

About Datavant

Datavant’s mission is to connect the world’s health data. Datavant works with data owners and users to ensure that data can be connected to power next-generation analytics and applications while protecting patient privacy. Datavant is headquartered in San Francisco. Learn more about Datavant at www.datavant.com.

About Health Data Link

Health Data Link enables research data collaboratives to form private data linkage networks based on their unique data governance needs. Their customers and partners use these trust networks to power comparative effectiveness health outcomes research, clinical trial recruitment, and de-identified patient locator services. Learn more about Health Data Link at www.healthdata.link.

Datavant Contact

Bob Borek, Head of Marketing
pr@datavant.com

View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/datavant-acquires-health-data-link-to-expand-academic-ecosystem-300860516.html

SOURCE Datavant

Tulane Alumna Appointed CEO of the Louisiana Public Health Institute

When Shelina Davis first arrived at the Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI), she was a young intern with a bright vision for the future of public health. Now, as LPHI’s newest CEO, Davis has all she needs to make her dreams reality.

Born in Metairie and raised in Mandeville, Davis has a passion for advancing public health and health equity in Louisiana. She holds master’s degrees in public health and social work from Tulane University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Xavier University. Her work focuses on the interconnection of public and behavioral health, primary-behavioral health care integration and health equity.

Davis’ career began in 2007 with a post-grad internship at LPHI. Following her internship, Davis was offered a position at LPHI as a coordinator to help monitor clinics being served by the Primary Care Access Stabilization Grant, a $100 million grant designed to restore and expand primary care access to New Orleans natives after Hurricane Katrina.

In 2013, Davis accepted a position as the director of practice improvement at the National Council for Behavioral Health. In this role, Davis helped reframe rhetoric around many mental health and substance misuse issues using a public health approach. She also implemented changes within healthcare organizations, and supported initiatives funded by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in developing strategies to eliminate health disparities, particularly among people with mental health and substance use disorders. By the time she returned to New Orleans in 2019, she was the assistant vice president of practice improvement.

In 2019, Davis was selected from a pool of highly qualified candidates to be the CEO of LPHI. On May 1, Davis succeeded Joseph Kimbrell as CEO.

Davis’ plans for the future of LPHI are big. At the forefront of her goals, she plans to promote health equity and raise Louisiana’s national health ratings.

“Louisiana is No. 50 in terms of health—we’re dead last,” said Davis. “So my vision is that Louisiana is the healthiest state in the country, and that we begin to live in a world where everyone has equitable opportunity to live healthy and productive lives.”

LPHI Supports New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition

About the Coalition

The New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition is a group of organizations, businesses, civic leaders, and everyday people who support improving our roadways and safe transportation options in order to enhance health, equity, sustainability, prosperity, and quality-of-life for the people of Greater New Orleans.

The current focus of the New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition is working with the City of New Orleans to update the current Complete Streets Policy to be equity-focused, data-driven, and publicly accountable. Read our letter to Mayor Cantrell with all the details on an updated Complete Streets Policy.

The New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition was instrumental in Connect The Crescent, a 3-month demonstration project of streets built to share and complete transportation networks. The Coalition is also supporting community engagement in the City’s Moving New Orleans Bikes planning process.

Members and supporters of the Complete Streets Coalition also support one another’s initiatives and events, meet regularly to discuss various opportunities and strategies for transportation improvements, and work to ensure strong community engagement in mobility decision-making.

Members and Supporters

Executive Committee

The New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition is lead by an Executive Committee comprised of the American Heart Association, Bike Easy, GirlTrek, and Ride New Orleans.

Members

New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition members actively participate in Coalition meetings and decision-making, help develop specific policy proposals, and support community engagement activities.

  • AARP Age-Friendly Task Force
  • AECOM
  • A Community Voice
  • American Heart Association
  • Bike Easy
  • Center for Planning Excellence
  • Committee for a Better New Orleans
  • Friends of Lafitte Greenway
  • Girl Trek New Orleans
  • Greater New Orleans Housing Alliance
  • Human Development Center at LSU Health New Orleans
  • Louisiana Cancer Prevention & Control Programs
  • Louisiana Public Health Institute
  • Lower 9th Ward NENA
  • Movin’ For Life
  • Music and Culture Coalition of New Orleans
  • New Orleans Black Social Workers
  • New Orleans Council on Aging
  • Ride New Orleans
  • Semi-Tough Cycling Club
  • Tulane Prevention Resource Center
  • University of New Orleans – Transportation Institute
  • The Urban Conservancy
  • The Water Collaborative
  • Wisznia Architecture & Development

Coalition Supporters

New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition supporters are organizations and businesses that sign on to support the vision and goals of the Coalition.

  • AARP
  • Access Health Louisiana
  • Adamick Architecture
  • Alembic Community Development
  • Algiers Point Association
  • Avenue Cafe
  • Bike Law Louisiana
  • Bike Shoppe
  • Blue Bikes
  • Bokah Bikes
  • Broad Theater
  • Byblos Development
  • Casa Borrega
  • Center for Planning Excellence
  • Central City Renaissance Alliance
  • Committee for a Better New Orleans
  • Community Voice
  • Dancing Grounds
  • Design Jones
  • Dig Easy
  • DiscoveryFEST Enrichment Program
  • Downtown Development District
  • Energy Wise Alliance
  • Entergy Louisiana
  • Felicity Redevelopment Inc.
  • FinLaw
  • Footprints for Fitness
  • Friends of Lafitte Greenway
  • Greater New Orleans Housing Alliance
  • Greater Living Witness Ministries
  • Green Coast Enterprises
  • Harmony Neighborhood Development
  • Higherpower Yoga and Cycling
  • Hollygrove-Dixon Neighborhood Association
  • HousingNOLA
  • Huber, Slack, Thomas & Marcelle, LLP
  • Jane Place Neighborhood Sustainability Initiative
  • LifeCity
  • Little Professor Child Development Center
  • Louisiana Public Health Institute
  • MACCNO
  • Mary Queen of Vietnam Community Development Corporation
  • New Orleans Black Social Workers
  • New Orleans Boulder Lounge
  • Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard Merchants
  • Orleans Coffee
  • Parker Barber
  • Parkway Partners
  • Pax Coffee
  • PlayBuild NOLA
  • Potence Gallery
  • Propeller
  • Redmellon Restoration & Development
  • Ride New Orleans
  • Rouler Cycling
  • Semi-Tough Cycling Club
  • Southern United Neighborhoods
  • Spitfire Coffee
  • StayLocal
  • Stumptown Coffee New Orleans
  • Tulane Canal Neighborhood Development Corporation
  • Tulane Prevention Resource Center
  • United Saints Recovery Project
  • University of New Orleans Transportation Institute
  • Urban Conservancy
  • WAMF
  • Water Collaborative
  • Wisznia Architecture & Development
  • Women with a Vision

New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition History

The New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition is a broad group of community organizations and businesses who came together in 2016 to build community support for safe and equitable mobility options for all people in New Orleans. The Coalition was born out of the former work of the Sustainable Transportation Action Committee (active from 2011 through 2015), and has been focused on working towards an updated City of New Orleans Complete Streets Policy that takes a data-driven, equity-focused, and transparent approach to reconstructing streets in a way that best accommodates all people, no matter how they travel – whether walking, biking, driving, taking transit, and/or using mobility-assistance devices.

The Coalition was instrumental in Mayor LaToya Cantrell’ s decision to include a Complete Streets policy update as a goal in her Forward Together transition plan. As an updated policy moves towards enactment and implementation, the New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition will be working to support implementation of Moving New Orleans: A Path Towards Equitable Transportation, Mayor Cantrell’s strategy for improving safety, equity, connectivity, and efficiency of transportation options in the City of New Orleans.

The New Orleans Complete Streets Coalition is committed to making sure our roadways provide safe transportation options for all, help us live with water, and create public spaces that promote a high quality-of-life.

LPHI Partners with New Orleans Fit NOLA

Though New Orleans is rich in culinary traditions and boasts nutritionally dense local crops such as sweet potatoes and mirlitons, few residents eat a sufficient amount and variety of fresh fruits and vegetables to maintain a healthy weight. Poor diet is a leading factor that contributes to high chronic disease in our community. Eleven percent of adults in the metro area have diabetes, and 64 percent are either overweight or obese. The Farmers Market Prescription Program (FMRx) aims to serve those individuals.

The FMRx program serves vulnerable residents in our community that need additional nutrition education and incentives to help make healthier food choices for their families, thereby expanding access to fresh local fruits and vegetables for all. The program educates participants about the importance of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and assists in reducing the risk of preventable health issues.

FMRx participants receive prescriptions redeemable for fruits and vegetables at the Crescent City Farmers Market and at other local market partners. Participants attend community health group meetings to receive prescriptions. Group meetings consist of recipe creation, cooking lessons, and overall healthy eating support. This program is on a hiatus while we seek additional partners.
Call (504) 861-4485 to learn more.

New Orleans’ Fit NOLA partnership

FMRx has been part of New Orleans’ Fit NOLA initiative that helped create a healthier city by promoting physical activity and improved nutrition. An unhealthy diet is a leading factor contributing to the incidence of chronic disease and poor health outcomes in our community. The FMRx program developed out of the FitNOLA initiative through a partnership between New Orleans Recreation Development Commission, New Orleans Health Department, Louisiana Public Health Institute, and Market Umbrella.The program educates participants about the importance of including more fruits and vegetables in their diets and connects them to community resources, such as free fitness classes and information about other healthy food incentive programs. With each iteration of the program, we evaluate and redesign our service delivery model to improve both physical and mental health for New Orleans residents. As part of Fit NOLA, the FMRx partners have connected hundreds of households to healthy food and fitness options right in their own neighborhoods to help people make lasting changes for their families and communities.

LPHI Endorses Young Bill to Help Protect Children from Lead Poisoning

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Todd Young (R-Ind.) joined a bipartisan group of Senators today to introduce the Lead-Safe Housing for Kids Act of 2019, which would require the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to update its lead poisoning prevention measures to reflect modern science and ensure that families and children living in federally-assisted housing are protected from the devastating consequences of lead poisoning.

“Protecting our children must always be priority number one,” said Senator Young. “All children deserve the opportunity to grow up in homes and communities that are safe from harmful toxins, and this legislation is an important step to ensure the utmost safety in federally assisted housing.”

Lead hazards in a home pose serious health and safety threats. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, lead hazards such as dust and chips from deteriorated lead-based paint are the most common source of lead exposure for U.S. children. A 2011 HUD survey found that lead-based paint is in roughly 37 million U.S. homes, 93 percent of which were built before 1978––the year lead-based paint use in housing was banned in the United States. While the available science for detecting and remediating lead hazards in a home has evolved significantly in the last two decades, federal laws and regulations continue to lag far behind, leaving vulnerable Americans—of whom a disproportionate amount are minorities—at the risk of being exposed lead before any intervention is triggered. Left unaddressed, lead poisoning can cause long-term and irreversible health, neurological, and behavioral problems in children.

Under HUD’s current lead hazard regulations, visual assessments are used to identify the presence of lead in a housing unit. However, while visual assessments—which usually entail identifying chipped and peeling paint—can show signs of lead hazards, modern scientific research has proven that such assessments are profoundly inadequate for identifying the most common sources of lead paint in a home: in intact painted surfaces such as window sashes and windowsills. In order to comprehensively determine the presence of lead and adequately protect children from lead poisoning, HUD’s policy must shift from identification and management to primary prevention.

Specifically, the Lead-Safe Housing for Kids Act of 2019 would ensure that families and children living in federally assisted housing are protected from the devastating consequences of lead poisoning by adopting primary prevention measures to protect children in low-income housing, including:

  • Prohibiting the use of visual assessments for low-income housing constructed prior to 1978 and requiring the use of more stringent risk assessments or more accurate evaluation tools that align with prevailing science to identify lead hazards before a family moves into the home;
  • Providing a process for families to relocate on an emergency basis, without penalty or the loss of assistance, if a lead hazard is identified in a home and the landlord fails to control the hazard within 30 days of being notified of the presence of lead; and
  • Requiring landlords to disclose the presence of lead if lead hazards are found in the home.

Senator Young joined Senators Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Tim Scott (R-S.C.), Bob Menendez (D-N.J.), Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.), Tim Kaine (D-Va.), Rob Portman (R-Ohio), and Tina Smith (D-Minn.) in introducing the bill.

The legislation is endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law, American Association of Poison Control Centers, American Hospital Association, ChangeLab Solutions, Center for Environmental Health, Conservation Law Foundation, Community Catalyst, Doctors for Global Health, Green & Healthy Homes Initiative, Habitat for Humanity International , Housing Assistance Council, Human Impact Partners, Health Justice Innovations, LLC, Lead Lab, Inc., MomsRising.org, National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), National Disability Rights Network, National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership, National Housing Law Project , National Housing Trust, National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, National Low Income Housing Coalition, Physicians for Social Responsibility, Chicago Hispanic Health Coalition, Elevate Energy, Erie Family Health Centers, Lawyers Committee for Better Housing, Metropolitan Tenants Organization, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Environmental Advocacy Clinic, Veterans for Peace Chicago Chapter, Poverty & Race Research Action Council, Prevention Institute, Progressive Doctors, Safe Kids Worldwide, Toxic Action Center Campaigns, Trust for America’s Health, United Parents Against Lead, Western Center on Law & Poverty, Housing Equality & Advocacy, Resource Team (HEART L.A.), Colorado Chapter—American, Academy of Pediatrics, Children’s Forum, Florida Association for Infant, Mental Health, Florida Center for Inclusive Communities, Florida Chapter—American Academy of Pediatrics, FSU Center for Prevention & Early Intervention Policy, Hoosier Environmental Council, We the People for East Chicago, Iowa Chapter—American Academy of Pediatrics, A Community Voice – Louisiana, Louisiana Public Health Institute, Louisiana Psychiatric Medical Association, Children’s Advocacy Center, Avesta Housing, Environmental Health Strategy Center, Maine Affordable Housing Coalition, Maine Children’s Alliance, Big Cities Health Coalition, The #BmoreLEADfree Initiative at Morgan State University, Disability Rights Maryland, Maryland Public Health Association, Public Justice Center, CLEARCorps Detroit, Ecology Center, Healthy Homes Coalition of West Michigan, Michigan Alliance for Lead Safe Homes, Michigan League for Public Policy, MSU-Hurley Pediatric Public Health Initiative, Mid-Minnesota Legal Aid, Mississippi Center for Justice, Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing & Opportunity Council, Saint Louis University Legal Clinic, St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Washington University School of Law Civil Rights & Community Justice Clinic, Arc of Nebraska, Community Action of Nebraska, Community Health Charities of Nebraska, Habitat for Humanity of Lincoln, Nebraska Appleseed, Omaha Healthy Kids Alliance, Voices for Children, Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada, Nevada Chapter—American Academy of Pediatrics, Greater Seacoast Community Health, New Hampshire Public Health Association, Southwestern Community Services, Isles, Inc., Children’s Defense Fund—New York, Center for the History & Ethics of Public Health, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia Law School Health Justice Advocacy Clinic at Morningside Heights Legal Services, Inc., Neighborhood Preservation Coalition, Ashe County Habitat for Humanity, Habitat for Humanity Cabarrus County, Lexington NC Area Habitat for Humanity, Inc., NC Child, North Carolina Coalition to End Homelessness, North Carolina Habitat for Humanity, North Carolina Justice Center, Person County Habitat for Humanity, Toxic Free NC, Children’s Defense Fund—Ohio, Cleveland Lead Safe Network, Coalition on Homelessness and Housing, Corporation for Ohio Appalachian Development, Environmental Health Watch, Fair Housing Center for Rights & Research, Habitat for Humanity in Cleveland County, Health Law Clinic, Milton A. Kramer Law Clinic Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Law, MetroHealth System, Northeast Ohio Black Health Coalition, Ohio Healthy Homes Network, Ohio Poverty Law Center, Schubert Center for Child, Studies at Case Western, Reserve University, Universal Health Care Action, Network of Ohio, Community Legal Services, HousingWorks RI, S.C. Appleseed Legal Justice Center, Tennessee Justice Center, Tennessee Voices for Children, Children’s Defense Fund—Texas, Vermont Legal Aid, Inc., Vermont Conservation Voters, Virginia Housing Alliance, Columbia Legal Services, Partners for our Children, Children’s Health Alliance of Wisconsin, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, Wisconsin Association of Local Health Departments, and the Wisconsin Public Health Association.

LPHI Participates in Leadership Program Helps Health Advocates Connect More Kids and Families to Medicaid

Members from the second class of the Children’s Health Leadership Network have completed the 12-month leadership program — and preserved, expanded or improved Medicaid in four states along the way.

The program — launched by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and Atlantic Philanthropies — equips participants with the skills, confidence and relationships needed to improve the health and well-being of kids and families in their respective states.
This year’s class divided into four-person teams and all members hailed from the South and Southwest, where states have long struggled to help children achieve key healthy milestones. These teams — representing Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana and Texas — developed and executed a policy agenda for their state and utilized a Results Count™ approach.

By the end of the program, each team had successes on record.

The Georgia team had facilitated Medicaid enrollment and renewal assistance at 225 Federally Qualified Health Centers throughout the state. Twenty percent of the 500,000 patients aided by this effort were children, including tens of thousands of children who were previously uninsured.
The Kentucky team had protected Medicaid access without work requirements for 1.4 million Kentuckians — including 551,000 children — via judicial remedy, collecting 12,000 public comments and sustaining statewide advocacy.

The Louisiana team had successfully advocated for the state’s RFP for Medicaid Managed Care Organizations to offer incentives for developmental screenings for children ages 0 to 3. About 700,000 kids in Louisiana rely on Medicaid and state children’s health insurance.
The Texas team had convened 42 organizations in support of policy priorities for full-year, continuous Medicaid coverage for three million children across the state.

“By strengthening the policy, advocacy and leadership skills of teams in challenging states, these leaders achieved bolder results for children,” says Jann Jackson, a senior associate focused on policy reform and advocacy at the Casey Foundation.

Participant Laura Guerra-Cardus, deputy director of the Children’s Defense Fund-Texas, explains that the program gave her a framework for thinking about policy change, building coalitions and crafting effective strategies. Her favorite part? The state team design, which — according to Guerra-Cardus — enabled the Texas delegation “to develop meaningful relationships with each other founded in trust; an understanding of each other and how we work; and the ability to build a powerful team to effect change.”

SEE AN INFOGRAPHIC OF CHILDREN’S HEALTH LEADERSHIP NETWORK RESULTS

Applications for the program’s third class will be available in 2020.

Meet the 2018–19 Children’s Health Leadership Network Participants

Georgia

Elise Blasingame, executive director, Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition of Georgia

Laura Colbert, executive director, Georgians for a Healthy Future

Lisa Hayes, independent consultant; former executive director, Chatham County Safety Net Planning Council

LaShun Wright, director of training and technical assistance, Georgia Primary Care Association

Kentucky

Emily Beauregard, executive director, Kentucky Voices for Health

Adrienne Bush, executive director, Homeless and Housing Coalition of Kentucky

Dustin Pugel, policy analyst, Kentucky Center for Economic Policy

Cara Stewart, chief of staff, Kentucky House Democratic Caucus Office

Louisiana

Raegan A. Carter, public health policy consultant; former senior manager, Louisiana Public Health Institute

Jeanie Donovan, policy director, Louisiana Department of Health

Susan Nelson, executive director, Louisiana Partnership for Children and Families

Alma Stewart, founder and director, Louisiana Center for Health Equity/Campaign for Health Care for Everyone

Texas

Jenny Eyer, director for child health research and policy, CHILDREN AT RISK

Laura Guerra-Cardus, deputy director, Children’s Defense Fund-Texas

Adriana Kohler, senior health policy associate, Texans Care for Children

Stacey Pogue, senior policy analyst, Center for Public Policy Priorities

About the Children’s Health Leadership Network

Launched in 2016, the Children’s Health Leadership Network is designed to strengthen the field of state-based advocates for children’s health policy.

These leaders can have a tremendous impact on the lives of children and families, according to Barbara Squires, director of Leadership Development at the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

“Through the tireless work of child health policy advocates, hundreds of thousands of children and families gain or maintain the necessary health care coverage that allows them to stay healthy, and we see health disparities start to close,” says Squires.

With funding from the Casey Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the Atlantic Philanthropies and supported by the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families, the Children’s Health Leadership Network will develop a pool of nearly 100 health advocates in leadership positions who are driving change and forging partnerships within their communities. The program’s first class of 16 advocates helped shape the policy landscape to improve health outcomes for children.

LPHI Supports F-NO: Public Health Film Festival of New Orleans

Below is a list of organizations who will help you take the next step in addressing issues covered at F-NO: Public Health Film Festival of New Orleans. We challenge all attendees to translate what they learned at festival into action.

International Health
The Pad Project
Help girls and women in developing countries gain independence through access to feminine products and control of the feminine product production process.

Partners in Health
Strive to achieve two overarching goals: to bring the benefits of modern medical science to those most in need, and to serve as an antidote to despair.

After violence
The Coalition to Stop Gun Violence
Seek to prevent gun violence through data-driven policy development and aggressive advocacy.

The Brady Campaign
Aims to reduce gun violence 25% by 2025.

Everytown for Gun Safety
A movement of Americans working together to end gun violence and build safer communities.

Giffords
Led by former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, Giffords works to tackle America’s gun violence crisis.

National Center for PTSD
A part of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the National Center for PTSD provides resources and information to improve patient care through research, education, and training in the diagnosis of PTSD.

Military OneSource
This organization provides free, confidential, non-medical counseling 24/7 to veterans coping with PTSD. Counselors can refer service members to services in their local community or provide support via face-to-face, online, or phone consultations.

National Alliance on Mental Illness
This website provides veterans with a comprehensive list of resources. They provide the answers to questions many are afraid to ask such as: Who should I tell? How will asking for treatment affect my career? What are the dangers of not disclosing?

PTSD Foundation of America
The PTSD Foundation of America is a non-profit dedicated to mentoring both combat veterans and their families experiencing PTSD. They offer counseling and peer mentoring, both individually and in a group setting. The organization also works to raise awareness of the needs of military families coping with PTSD through community awareness.

National Resource Directory
This website pools information from federal, state, and local levels. They provide a comprehensive resource list for veterans, military, and their families on everything from PTSD services to caregiver support

HIV In the South

Local Organizations

Access Health

Access Health Louisiana (AHL) is the largest network of Federally Qualified Health Centers in the state. Our network of more than 90 providers sees more than 44,500 patients a year in eleven Parishes in southern and central Louisiana.
Louisiana Health Hub
The STD/HIV Program (SHP) coordinates a number of statewide and regional programs designed to prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other STDs, to ensure the availability of quality medical and social services for HIV infected and affected individuals, and to track the impact of the epidemic in Louisiana.

Louisiana Public Health InstituteThe mission of LPHI’s HIV/STI Program is to stop the spread of HIV and other STIs and improve the health and quality of life of individuals living with and vulnerable to HIV/STIs in Louisiana.
New Orleans Regional AIDS Planning Council

The mission of the New Orleans Regional AIDS Planning Council is to develop and maintain a comprehensive system of care for persons living with HIV/AIDS in the New Orleans area that is accessible, responsive, culturally sensitive and of the highest quality to ensure that all persons living with HIV/AIDS live with dignity.
Brotherhood Incorporated

Established in 1995, Brotherhood, Incorporated is a minority non-profit community based organization created to join the fight against the spread of HIV and alleviate the struggles of African Americans living with HIV and AIDS.
Project Lazarus

Project Lazarus provides transitional housing to people living with HIV/AIDS who have no other place to live.

National/International Organizations:

AIDS United

AIDS United’s mission is to end the AIDS epidemic in the United States through strategic grantmaking, capacity building, policy/advocacy, technical assistance and formative research.

The AIDS Healthcare Foundation

The AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) is a global nonprofit organization providing medicine and advocacy to over 1,000,000 in 43 countries. They are currently the largest provider of HIV/AIDS medical care in the US.

National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC)

NMAC draws attention to racial disparities in communities affected HIV and AIDS.

Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation

The organization’s goal is to raise money for pediatric HIV/AIDS research and encourage companies to test drugs for HIV-positive children.

International AIDS Society

The mission of the International AIDS Society (IAS) is to “lead collective action on every front of the global HIV response.” This member-based organization is one of the largest associations of HIV professionals.

HIV.gov

HIV Overview, HIV Prevention, HIV Testing, Starting HIV Care, Staying in HIV Care, Living Well with HIV.

AIDS.gov

HIV Overview, HIV Prevention, HIV Treatment, Side Effects of HIV Medicine, HIV and Pregnancy, HIV and Specific Populations, HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions, Living with HIV.

AIDSVu

AIDSVu is an interactive online mapping tool that visualizes the impact of the HIV epidemic on communities across the United States.

Greater Than AIDS

The Kaiser Family Foundation launched Greater Than AIDS in 2009. They work to provide targeted media and community outreach designed to increase understanding and reduce stigma around HIV and AIDS.

REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE

Local Organizations:

New Orleans Abortion Fund

NOAF affirms a person’s right to control their body and work to ensure that all people have access to quality medical care, regardless of their econfde4waadfddfomic situation. Working with local medical providers, they provide compassionate and empowering assistance to patients seeking abortions who are unable to fully fund their abortion, and distribute pledges as available.

Women With a Vision

WWAV envisions a world in which there is no war against women and women’s bodies, in which women have spaces to come together to tell their stories, in which women empower themselves to make decisions about their own bodies and lives, and in which women have the support they need to realize their hopes and dreams.

The Reproductive Justice Action Collective (ReJAC)

ReJAC is a New Orleans network that aims to share information, resources, ideas, and human power to create and implement projects in the community that operate within the reproductive justice framework.

Lift Louisiana

The mission of Lift Louisiana is to educate, advocate, and litigate for policy changes needed to improve the health and wellbeing of Louisiana’s women, their families, and their communities.

National Organizations:

All* Above All

All* Above All unites organizations and individuals to build support for lifting bans that deny abortion coverage. Their vision is to restore insurance coverage so that every woman, however much she makes, can get affordable safe abortion care when she needs it.
For a list of All* Above All partner organizations — a comprehensive list of national organizations working for reproductive rights — click here.

EPIDEMICS IN WEST AFRICA

Partners in Health

Partners In Health is working hard in support of their partners on the ground (Last Mile Health in Liberia and Wellbody Alliance in Sierra Leone) by recruiting volunteers, clinicians, and logistical support. They recognize the Ebola outbreak in West Africa as “a defining global health challenge of our time,” that needs to be addressed through strong partnerships that protect against the spread of Ebola today, and build strong health-care systems for these affected countries moving forward.

UNICEF

UNICEF is on the ground in West Africa, providing a variety of essential services around resource procurement and delivery. UNICEF has gone above and beyond in the fight against Ebola by providing water and sanitation services to affected communities and deploying committed professionals in the fields of health, communication, and sanitation to the region.

Doctors Without Borders

Doctors Without Borders has intervened in most Ebola epidemics, including the largest one ever—in West Africa from 2014 to 2016—and the second-largest one now ongoing in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). No cure exists, but a promising new vaccine and several still-experimental treatments are bringing hope in the battle against this deadly disease.

ActionAid

Working in the region since 1997, ActionAid’s teams of volunteers in Sierra Leone and Liberia are using their grassroots and community connections and trust to spread valuable public health information.

Africare

The Africare team is supplying hundreds of community health workers with simplified leaflets on the “Do’s and Don’ts” of Ebola treatment. In addition, the organization has reached 100,000 LIberians and is working hard to increase access to Ebola prevention education and behavior change information across the country.

Last Mile Health

Last Mile Health strongly believes that no one should die because they live too far from a doctor. Their team is working hard to bring medical care and supplies to rural communities in Liberia, by deploying an innovative Frontline Health Worker model that brings services directly to villagers’ doorsteps.

Caritas Internationalis

At the beginning of the Ebola outbreak, Caritas’ teams of volunteers, originally stationed in the region fighting HIV, turned their focus to eliminating Ebola. Armed with megaphones, soap, bleach, and posters, Caritas’ utilizes effective communication as a game-changing weapon against the spread of Ebola. Partnering with local radio stations and international organizations like UNICEF, the heroes at Caritas are approaching this crisis from all angles.

Catholic Relief Services

CRS’ response to the Ebola outbreak began immediately and swiftly following news of the first reported case in Guinea. Since then, CRS’ staff of medical experts and volunteers have developed strong partnerships with governments in Sierra Leone. Serving on Sierra Leone’s National Ebola Task Force communications team, CRS is intensifying awareness-raising activities throughout the country. CRS’ work has been far-reaching and indispensable.

MAP International

MAP International has made it their mission to provide West Africa’s valiant healthcare workers with the equipment they need to effectively treat Ebola without the risk of the infection spreading. In the battle against an incurable infectious disease, MAP International recognizes the importance of containment through proper use of quality medical supplies.

INDIGENOUS JUSTICE

Bayou Bridge

Online multimedia project associated with the film.

Amá

Outreach campaign, with online petition, action steps and option to donate.

Homepage V2

Our Mission: LPHI leads and partners with communities to ensure that everyone has fair and  just opportunities to be healthy and well.
Our Vision: A Louisiana where all people will achieve their full potential for health and wellness.
Our Values: Accountability, Community-Centered, Creativity, Equity, Excellence, and Partnership & Trust

Strategic Plan Priority Areas and Goals

Racial Justice and Health Equity

Make LPHI a model for racial justice and health equity.​

Partnerships and Collaboration

Nurture and cultivate partnerships and collaborations to accelerate community impact.

A Healthier
Louisiana

Create a healthier Louisiana by applying our expertise, assets, and innovation.

A Thriving Organization

Build a thriving learning organization that embodies adaptability, equity, and lays a strong foundation for excellence. ​

Latest News From LPHI

History

Joe Kimbrell, Former CEO, Receives State and City Recognition

LPHI is pleased to announce that Joe Kimbrell, former LPHI CEO, has received the Health Hero Award from the Louisiana Department of Health. The award, given by Dr. Rebekah Gee, Secretary of the Department of Health, recognizes individuals for their commitment to improving health of Louisiana’s residents.

In the last two decades, Kimbrell implemented positive change and growth through the establishment of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, guiding the organization and generating more than $400 million in resources to support public health programming within Louisiana and parts of the Gulf Coast. Read the full letter from Dr. Gee here.

The City of New Orleans Office of the Mayor also recognized Joe for his years of service and commitment to the Greater New Orleans community during his more than 20 years of work with LPHI and the city.

Leaders and Youth Gather to Address Louisiana’s Teen Smoking/Vaping Crisis

RUSTON, LA – Louisiana ranks well above the national average in the number of teen smokers and has a growing vaping crisis. In response to this alarming trend, today, the Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) educated the community, public officials and advocates about combating tobacco use among youth during a Kick Butts Day event on the campus of Louisiana Technical University.

Kick Butts Day is a national day of activism that empowers youth to stand out, speak up and take a stand against Big Tobacco.

“The purpose of Kick Butts Day events is to raise awareness of the problem of tobacco use across all demographics, but particularly young people” said Tonia Moore, TFL Director. “We encourage middle school and high school-aged youth to reject the tobacco industry’s deceptive marketing and stay tobacco-free, and we urge elected officials to take action to protect youth from tobacco,” said Tonia Moore, TFL Director. “We want to see our youth lead the way to toward a healthier future.

Ruston Mayor Ronny Walker spoke to the need for legislation in communities around the state that will protect citizens from second-hand smoke.

“Ruston has several healthy community initiatives. One example is the recent passing and implementation of our smoke-free ordinance.” said Walker. “With this legislation, Ruston became the 21st municipality in the state to adopt a comprehensive smoke-free policy and we encourage other communities to create their own road map to tobacco-free policies.”

Dr. Alex Billoux, Assistant Secretary of Health for the Office of Public Health-Louisiana, outlined some of the initiatives currently in place to curb smoking and vaping and shared the alarming statistics related to teen tobacco use:

12.3% of Louisiana’s teens use tobacco, above the national average of 8.1%.
Between 2015 and 2017, the use of e-cigarettes increased by 48.2% among Louisiana high school students and 65.4% among Louisiana middle school students.
More than 2,000 young people in Louisiana become new daily smokers each year.

“It’s clear that if we are going to achieve a tobacco-free Louisiana, we have to start with protecting our youth,” said Dr. Billioux. “The Louisiana Department of Health partners with several organizations throughout the state to implement innovative approaches to curb youth tobacco use. Together with our partners, we will continue to move Louisiana’s health forward statewide.”

The keynote presentation by Alayna P. Tackett, PhD., a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center, presented her research on the popular youth tobacco product JUUL and the effects of vaping on youth.

For more information about tobacco-free initiatives, visit https://kickbuttsday.org or https://tobaccofreeliving.org.

The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living

The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living (TFL) engages in local and statewide tobacco control policy efforts that focus on tobacco prevention and initiation among youth, eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke, promote cessation services, and identify and eliminate tobacco-related disparities. TFL is guided by best practices in tobacco control, and envisions a healthier Louisiana by reducing the excessive burden of tobacco use on all Louisianans. For more information visit www.tobaccofreeliving.org. To find out more about the dangers of secondhand smoke and show your support for a smoke-free Louisiana, visit www.healthierairforall.org. To learn more about quitting tobacco, visit www.quitwithusla.org.

About the Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium (LCRC)

Founded by the Louisiana State Legislature in 2002, the LCRC is a public-private partnership designed to promote education about cancer and conduct important research on the diagnosis, detection, treatment, and prevention of cancer in Louisiana. The LCRC partners with the public at large and four major cancer research institutions in Louisiana: LSU Health, Tulane University, Ochsner Health System, and Xavier University. More information about the LCRC is available at www.louisianacancercenter.org.

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